Tuesday, January 21, 2014

IT'S BACK.... IT'S TIME FOR THE TERM GAME!!!!!

IT'S HERE!!!!  IT'S FINALLY HERE!!!

WHAT YOU ASK???? OMG!!!!! IT'S ONLY THE MOST AWESOME GAME IN THE WORLD!!!!
THAT'S RIGHT.... THIS GAME IS KNOWN WORLD WIDE AND HAS A LOYAL APUSH FOLLOWING!!!  YOU PLAYED IT - YOU KNOW JUST HOW ADDICTED YOU ARE TO THE GAME!!!  BET YOUR EXCITED!!

Ok, so let me explain to you once again (since I did this in class already).  I will start the game off by giving you a historical term of which you have had since you started taking APUSH (that's right, all the way back to chapter 1).  The person responding to me, must give the HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE of that term and then that person names the next term, beginning with the next letter. Here is an example (not related to the subject, just so none of you really smart children decide to try and rip mine off....):

EXAMPLE:
I post the word "APPLE"
John Doe responses with: "A fruit of which fell from a tree and hit Isaac Newton in the head; thus launching the Scientific Revolution"  NEXT WORD: BATS.....

And thus the game would have begun.  Again, remember that my example is NOT one of your historical terms.  You can use ANY of the terms you have had up to this point.  That means you can use APUSH 1 terms and APUSH 2 terms (up to Chapter 34).

Dealing with X, Y, and Z words.  True, there aren't many of these in your APUSH historical terms, but to make the game interesting - when you get to any of these three letters, you must use any that does exist.  If there are no more words that begin with X, Y, or Z (x & z will be the hardest), then you can declare a "SKIP" and move to the next letter.  WARNING:  if the person responding to your next letter finds a word that has not be used - then they can declare a FOUL and YOU (the one that declared the "SKIP" will lose point.

BTW - when you reach the end of the alphabet - you know... you just start over from the beginning!

How to win at this game.  Post the most historical significant definitions and new words.  The winner gets a free homework pass to be used on any assignment they choose!!!

The game stops at mid-night on Friday!!!

GOOD LUCK!!!!


FIRST WORD: Anaconda Plan

417 comments:

  1. The anaconda plan replaced the Peninsula Campaign after it failed. The plan was to suffocate their supplies, liberate the slaves, cut it in half, divide it into pieces, capture Richmond, and grind it to submission

    ReplyDelete
  2. Vasco Nunez Balboa was Spanish conquistador and explorer who established the first settlement on the South American continent at Darién, on the coast of the Isthmus of Panama. In 1513, while leading an expedition in search of gold, he sighted the Pacific Ocean. Balboa claimed the ocean for Spain, which opened the way later for Spanish exploration and conquest along the western coast of South America. Balboa's ambitious goals and achivements posed a threat to Pedro Arias Dávila (the Spanish governor of Darién): who falsely accused him of treason and had him executed in early 1519.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Conquistadores- Spanish conquerors that fanned out across the Caribbean and American continents. Conquistadores helped Spain become the dominant exploring and colonizing power in the 1500s. This aided Spanish explorers in discovering new lands and bodies of water (ex. Vasco Nunez Balboa discovered Pacific Ocean.) (Pg. 17)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Divorce Bill: A bill passed by Van Buren in 1837, that divorced the government from banking altogether, and established an independent treasury, so the government could lock its money in vaults in several of the larger cities.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The Embargo Act of 1807- a law passed by Congress forbidding all exportation of goods from the United States. Britain and France had been continuously harassing the U.S. and seizing U.S. ship's and men. The U.S. was not prepared to fight in a war, so Jefferson hoped to weaken Britain and France by stopping trade. The Embargo Act ended up hurting the American economy more than that of the French and British. It was repealed in 1809. The Embargo Act helped to revive the Federalists. It caused New England's industry to grow. It eventually led to the War of 1812.

    ReplyDelete
  6. David G. Farragut :a union admiral remembered for running a blockade of torpedoes while taking mobile.As Grant pushes toward the Mississippi River, a Union fleet of about 40 ships approached the river's mouth in Louisiana. This commander seized New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Natchez

    ReplyDelete
  7. Great Awakening- a religious revival in the American colonies of the eighteenth century during which a number of new Protestant churches were established. It was a wave of religious enthusiasm among Protestants that swept the American colonies in the 1730s and 1740s, leaving a permanent impact on American religion. It undermined older clergy, created schisms, increased compositeness of churches, and encouraged missionary work, led to the founding new schools. It was first spontaneous movement of the American people. (Pg. 99)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Sam Houston:United States politician and military leader who fought to gain independence for Texas from Mexico and to make it a part of the United States (1793-1863). Also, the first president of the Republic of Texas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's no term for indentured servants, only for indentured servitude

      Delete
  9. Indentured Servitude- the system where the passage to the New World for a poor European was payed for by someone in the New World. After coming to the New World, that person had to work as a servant for the person who payed their passage for 4-7 years, or until they worked off their debt. After they worked off their debt, a servant would then receive a small plot of land and some items necessary for starting up a life. This was an important system because it lured many English to come to the New World. Later, when the indentured servants would be denied the land after paying off their debt, Nathaniel Bacon would rise up and start a rebellion against the Governor Berkley. (Pgs. 69-71)

    ReplyDelete
  10. Jeremiad:(1600's) New type of sermon from Puritan preachers. Preachers had noticed a decline in religious devotion of 2nd generation settlers. Jeremiad focused on the teachings of Jeremiah, a Biblical prophet who warned of doom.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Kansas Nebraska Act: a compromise law in 1854 that suspended the Missouri Compromise, and left it to voters in Kansas and Nebraska to determine whether they would be slave or free states. The law worsened sectional tensions when voters can to blows over the question of slavery in Kansas.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Laird Rams: two confederate warships with iron and large caliber guns being built in Britain. It could break though Union blockade. Minister Adams warned if they were given to Confederacy that Union would go to war with Britain.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Marbury V. Madison: 1803 Court case in which William Marbury sued James Madison for not delivering John Adam's commission about Marbury becoming a judge. Marshall ruled, that under the Judiciary Act, Marbury would get the job, but that the Judiciary Act was unconstitutional, setting up the doctrine of judicial review

    ReplyDelete
  14. Napoleon III: treated Union with contempt. Abandoned Maximillian in 1867 and Mexico once again independent. nephew of napoleon bonaparte, and elected emperor of france from 1852-1870. He invaded mexico when the mexican government couldn't repay loans from french bankers. He sent in an army and set up a new government under maximillian. He refused lincoln's request that france withdraw. And after the civil war, the u.s. sent an army to enforce the request and napoleon withdrew.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Olive Branch Petition: The colonies' final offer of peace to Britain, agreeing to be loyal to the British government if it addressed their grievances (repealed the Coercive Acts, ended the taxation without representation policies). It was rejected by Parliament, which in December 1775 passed the American Prohibitory Act forbidding all further trade with the colonies.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Peninsula Campaign: a major Union operation launched in southeastern Virginia from March through July 1862(the first large-scale offensive in the Eastern Theater)
    The operation, commanded by Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan, was an amphibious turning movement intended to capture the Confederate capital of Richmond by circumventing the Confederate States Army in Northern Virginia.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Republican motherhood- Women did not go untouched by revolutionary ideals. A central ideology in republicanism is civic virtue, the notion that democracy depended on the unselfish commitment of each citizen to the public good. At the time a mother’s job was to nurture her child and instill these morals into it. The selfless devotion of the mother was often used as a model to show ‘proper republican’ behavior. This ‘new’ motherly duty elevated the women to a special role in the maintaining of keep the nation’s conscience. Due to this new education opportunities were available to women (Pg. 176)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Edwin M. Stanton: an American lawyer and politician who served as Secretary of War under the Lincoln Administration during the American Civil War from 1862-1865. His effective management helped organize the massive military resources of the North and guide the Union to victory.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Tariff of Abominations
    Definition: also called Tariff of 1828; it raised the tariff on imported manufactured goods.
    Historical Significance: The tariff protected the north but harmed the south; south said that the tariff was economically discriminatory and unconstitutional because it violated state's rights. South began to protest. It passed because New England favored high tariffs.
    (Pg. 280)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Next Term: United Negro Improvement Association

      Delete
  20. United Negro Improvement Association: ( UNIA) a black nationalist organization founded in 1914 by the Jamaican-born Marcus Garvey in order to promote resettlement of African Americans to their "African homeland" and to stimulate a vigorous separate black economy within the United States.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Clement L. Vallandigham: an anti-war Democrat who criticized Lincoln as a dictator, calling him "King Abraham". He was arrested and exiled to the South.
    Prominent copperhead who was an ex-congressman from ohio, demanded an end to the war, and was banished to the confederacy

    ReplyDelete
  22. William T. Sherman :he fought in the Vicksburg and Chatanooga campaigns and he undertook the Atlanta Campaign. He burned Atlanta and set off, with a force of 60,000, on his famous march to the sea, devastating the country. After capturing Savannah, he turned north through S. Carolina, and received the surrender of General Johnston.

    ReplyDelete
  23. XYZ affair
    Definition: John Adams, in an effort to meet with Charles Maurice de Talleyrand, sent three men referred to as X, Y, and Z (John Marshall, the future chief justice, was one of those men). John Adams wanted to reach an agreement with the furious French, who were infuriated because of Jay’s Treaty, to prevent debt from war. When X, Y, and Z arrived, the French spokesmen demanded an unneutral loan of 32 million florins (a type of gold coin) plus a bribe of $250,000 just to merely speak with Talleyrand. The American trio refused to pay these bribes and intolerable terms and left. X, Y, and Z’s trip, or affair, sent a wave of hysteria throughout the US. The Federalists were happy while the French-favoring Jeffersonians were shameful of the behavior of the French. The US prepared for war and managed to confine the the bloodshed to the seas. American men-of-war of the new navy captured over 80 armed French vessels.
    Historical Significance: The XYZ affair showed the American’s good intentions of preventing war and refusal of ridiculous terms given by the French, who after the bloodshed realized they likewise wanted to avoid war
    (Pg. 215)

    ReplyDelete
  24. Yankee Ingenuity : was often necessary for New England colonists. Unlike the rich and fertile soil of Virginia, New England had poor soil as well as a harsh winter and had to rely on improvisation and other means for economic success.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Wow!!! APUSH 1 is kicking ya'lls butt!!! They have already posted 153 post!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well Mr. Gehm, APUSH II = always procrasting X 2

      Delete
    2. Or we're just not as eager as APUSH I

      Delete
    3. That must be it.... since there are only 2 of you doing this.... Course, if and when the others jump on - you'll both be way ahead in points!!!!

      Delete
  26. Zimmerman Note: Germany sent this to Mexico instructing an ambassador to convince Mexico to go to war with the U.S. It was intercepted and caused the U.S. to mobilized against Germany, which had proven it was hostile

    ReplyDelete
  27. Alabama: The Alabama was a screw sloop-of-war built for the CSA Navy at Britain in 1862 by John Laird Sons & Co. It served as a commerce raider, attacking Union merchant and naval ships for over 2 years. It never entered a Southern port. 1864; The Alabama was sunk by the USS Kearsarge.The Alabama was a British ship (commerce raider) controlled by Confederates. 1862; It escaped to the Portuguese Azores to take on weapons and an English crew, never entering a Southern port. It captured 60 Northern vessels, which angered the North who had to divert naval strength from the blockade to the Alabama. 1864; The Alabama was destroyed by a Union cruiser off the coast of France. U.S. minister Charles Francis Adams convinced Britain that ships of the kind were a dangerous precedent against them and convinced Britain to stay neutral in the war. Britain later apologized for the Alabama business and paid $15.5 million in damages caused by commerce raiders to U.S. ships (1871-72).

    ReplyDelete
  28. Battle of Saratoga- Revolutionary battle where the Americans secured a much needed victory, and forced General Burgoyne to surrender his entire command at Saratoga, and captured many much needed weapons. (Pg. 160)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nice one - right out of your notebook... you even gave the page #

      Delete
    2. Bonus points for page numbers? lol

      Delete
  29. Cohens v. Virginia: Supreme Court has jurisdiction over any national court ruling of constitutionality, and state laws that oppose the Constitution are void. (Cohens was found guilty by the state court of VA of selling lottery tickets illegally)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. FOUL: Not a term we were assigned

      Delete
    2. Oh srry idk why but i have that in my notebook, anyways, Next Term: Compromise of 1877

      Delete
  30. Compromise of 1877: During the electoral standoff in 1876 between Hayes (Republican) and Tilde (Democrat). The Compromise of 1877 meant that the Democrats reluctantly agreed that Hayes might take office if he ended reconstruction in the South (Page 545)
    Historical Significance: Ended Reconstruction. Republicans promise removable of military from South, also appoint Democrat to cabinet (David Key postmaster general), and Federal money for railroad construction and levees on Mississippi river

    ReplyDelete
  31. John Dewey: was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. He, along with Charles Sanders Peirce and William James, is recognized as one of the founders of the philosophical school of Pragmatism.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Ralph Waldo Emerson: United States writer and leading exponent of transcendentalism (1803-1882)

    ReplyDelete
  33. Fort Sumter: A fort in SE South Carolina, guarding Charleston Harbour. Its capture by Confederate forces (1861) was the first action of the Civil War.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Greenback labor party- political party active in the United States between 1881 and 1908 supported mainly by farmers in the south and west. A product of the populist movement, the people's party was the successor of the greenback labor party of the 1880s. Pg 556

    ReplyDelete
  35. Favored some reforms of the civil service system and restrained policy toward the defeated South half loyal to Grant and half to reform the spoils system.
    Next term: Iroquois confederacy

    ReplyDelete
  36. Iroquois Confederacy- (a.k.a. “League of the Iroquois,”) bound together five Indian nations- the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas. It was founded in the late 1500s by two leaders, Deganawidah and Hiawatha. The Iroquois Confederacy developed the political and organizational skills to sustain a robust military alliance that menaced its neighbors, Native Americans and Europeans, for well over a century. This was the closest example to an Indian Nation-State in North America. (Pgs. 10, 42-43)

    ReplyDelete
  37. Jay's Treaty: A treaty which offered little concessions from Britain to the U.S Jay was able to get Britain to say they would evacuate the chain of posts on U.S. soil and pay damages for recent seizures of American ships. This resulted in a vitalization of the Democratic-Republicans and Pinckney's Treaty with the Spanish.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Know Nothings- a former political party active in the 1850s to keep power out of the hands of immigrants and Roman Catholics (called nativists)

    ReplyDelete
  39. Land ordinance: divided the northwestern territory into sections. Proceeds from the land sales went to pay off national debt
    Next term: middle passage

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wait.. there's two of em' ?? Well...

      Delete
    2. No, there's only the 1785. 1787 was the Northwest Ordinance

      Delete
  40. Middle Passage- The portion of the slaves journey in which slaves were carried from Africa to the Americas. The middle passage was how many events later in the New World happened. Everything from millions of deaths of African slaves, to being an economical profit for people started when they completed the middle passage. Bringing African slaves to Americas had a big impact on the shaping of America. It could even have been the cause of the civil war to end slavery. (Pgs. 73-74)

    ReplyDelete
  41. Nonimportation agreement: (1765 and after) Boycotts against British goods adopted in response to the Stamp Act and later, The Townshend and Intolerable Acts. The agreements were the most effective form of protest against British policies in the colonies.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Replies
    1. (It wouldnt let me continue commenting on the last post)

      Delete
    2. ok I foudn one in my notes lol...Old Lights, New Lights

      Delete
  43. Old and New Lights- Groups who both opposed and were for the religious revival known as the Great Awakening. It’s emphasis on the direct, emotive spirituality undermindermided the old clergy, whose authority came from their education. (Pg. 100)

    ReplyDelete
  44. Plantation System:system used in the South that allowed Southern aristocrats to own numerous slaves. A type of class system that does not allow social mobility.
    Historical Significance: The plantation system also shaped the lives of southern women. The mistress of a great plantation commanded a sizeable household staff of mostly female slaves.
    Next term: Quebec Act

    ReplyDelete
  45. Quebec Act- Act in 1774 that accompanied the “Intolerable Acts”. Regarded as British’s reaction to the turbulence in Boston, it allowed French residents to retain their traditional political and religious institutions, and extended the boundaries of the province southward to the Ohio River. It was mistakenly perceived by the colonists to be part of the parliament’s response to the Boston tea party. From the viewpoint of the French they felt it was a smart and good idea. The English saw this as harmful and it had a wider range then the intolerable acts. It set a dangerous precedent by retaining representative assemblies, alarmed land speculator, and aroused anti-Catholics. (Pg. 136)

    ReplyDelete
  46. Revolution of 1800:Jefferson claimed that the election of 1800 was a ‘revolution’ comparable to that of 1776, and historians have sometimes referred to the Revolution of 1800. Electoral victory of Democratic republicans over the Federalists, who lost their Congressional majority and the presidency. The peaceful transfer of power between the rival parties solidified faith in America’s political system
    Next term: Sarjevo

    ReplyDelete
  47. Sarajevo- the city in which the heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary was shot and killed by a Serbian patriot. (Page 738)
    Historical Significance: An outraged Vienna government, backed by Germany, presented a stern ultimatum to Serbia, eventually igniting World War I. Sarajevo is the place where the events and decisions leading to World War I started. The killing of the heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary in Sarajevo sparked the start of the “War to End All Wars.”

    ReplyDelete
  48. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  49. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  50. U-boat- German submarines, also known as U-boats, performed deadly work. (Page 740)
    Historical Significance: in the first few months of 1915, they sank about ninety ships in the war zone. U-boat attacks played an important role in drawing the United States into the war.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Ok since there was a screw up with T... next term is Tripolitan Wars

    ReplyDelete
  52. Four-year conflict between the American Navy and the North African nation of Tripoli over piracy in the Mediterranean. Jefferson, a staunch noninterventionist, reluctantly deployed American forces, eventually securing a peace treaty with Tripoli. War across the Atlantic was not part of Jeffersonian vision- but neither was paying tribute to pack of pirate states. The showdown came in 1801. The pasha of Tripoli, dissatisfied with his share of protection money, informally declared war on the United States by cutting down the flagstaff of the American consulate.
    Next Term: Underwood Tariff Bill

    ReplyDelete
  53. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  54. Underwood Tariff Bill- Moved by Wilson’s aggressive leadership, the House swiftly passed the Underwood Tariff Bill, which provided for a substantial reduction of rates. When a swarm of lobbyists descended on the Senate seeking to disembowel the bill, Wilson promptly issued a combative message to the people, urging them to hold their elected representatives in line. The tactic worked. The force of public opinion, aroused by the president’s oratory, secured late in 1913 final approval of the bill Wilson wanted. (Page 691)
    Historical significance: The new Underwood Tariff substantially reduced import fees. It also was a landmark in tax legislation. Under authority granted by the recently ratified Sixteenth Amendment, Congress enacted a graduated income tax, beginning with a modest levy on incomes over $3,000 (then considerably higher than the average family’s income). By 1917 revenue from the income tax shot ahead of receipts from the tariff. This gap has since been vastly widened.

    ReplyDelete
  55. Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions: Were a brilliant formulation of the extreme states’ rights view regarding the Union- indeed more sweeping in their implications than their authors had intended. They were later used by southerners to support nullification and ultimately secession. Statements secretly drafted by Jefferson and Madison for the legislatures of Kentucky and Virginia. Argued that states were final arbiters of whether the federal government overstepped its boundaries and could therefore nullify, or refuse to accept, national legislation they deemed unconstitutional.
    Next Term: 'wildcat banks"

    ReplyDelete
  56. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  57. wildcat banks
    Definition: unstable banking institutions that issued paper money called wildcat currency to lend to speculators. They were operated under state charters and were especially numerous after Jackson defeated the second B.U.S. They didn't require collateral for loans so farmers took out loans, bought land, lost money on the land, defaulted on their loans, and then the banks started to fail.
    Historical Significance: The panic of 1837 was a symptom of the financial sickness of the times. Its basic cause was rampant speculation prompted by a mania of get-rich-quickism. Gamblers in western lands were doing a “land-office business” on borrowed capital, much of it in the shaky currency of “wildcat banks”. The speculative craze spread to canals, roads, railroads, and slaves.
    (Pg. 292)

    ReplyDelete
  58. Brigham Young: He seized the falling torch of the movements started by Joseph Smith of the Mormons.
    Historical Significance: Although he only received eleven days of formal schooling, he quickly proved to be an aggressive leader, an eloquent preachers, and a gifted administrator. Determined to escape further persecution, he led his oppressed and despoiled Latter-Day Saints (1846-1847) over vast rolling plains to Utah as they sang ‘Come, Come, Ye Saints’
    Next term: Zenger, John Peter

    ReplyDelete
  59. John Peter Zenger- Zenger assaulted the corrupt royal government in his paper. This caused the Zenger Trial. In it Zenger with seditious libel. He won the case. This was a major stepping stone in history. By winning the case, freedom of press was established. This pointed to a more democratic America. (Pgs. 103-104)

    ReplyDelete
  60. ABC powers: includes Argentina, Brazil and Chile
    Historical Significance: full-dress shooting conflict between the U.S and Mexico seemed inevitable. Wilson was rescued by the ABC powers who offered mediation. Huerta collapsed in July 1914 under pressure from within and without.
    Next Term: Black Legend

    ReplyDelete
  61. Black Legend- false concept that held that the conquerors merely tortured and butchered the Indians, stole their gold, infected them with smallpox, and left little but misery behind and did nothing else. Actually, the Spanish erected a colossal empire, sprawling from California and Florida to Tierra del Fuego, where they grafted their culture, laws, religion and language onto a wide array of native societies. This laid the foundation for a score of Spanish-speaking nations. (Pg. 24)

    ReplyDelete
  62. John C Calhoun: In the elections of 1824, he appeared to be the vice-presidential candidate on both the Adams and Jackson tickets. All four presidential candidates professed to be ‘Republicans.’ Well organized parties had not yet emerged. He secretly wrote the South Carolina Exposition in 1828 denouncing the tariff of 1828.
    Next Term: Democratic Party

    ReplyDelete
  63. Democratic party
    Definition: Belief in a Democratic Government, in which people are represented by holders of political office, and these politicians vote and make decisions for the whole of the Country.
    Historical Significance: The Democratic Party is a group of people consisting of those with a strong belief in Democratic Ideals. The Democratic Party was formed out of the ashes of multiple prior political machines, and is a party that has remained in existence for many years. While Democracy itself has changed and been reshaped many times throughout U.S. history, the Democratic party has remained constant, and has had many great Presidents, including Andrew Jackson.
    (Pgs. 300-303)

    ReplyDelete
  64. Economic Coercion: Economic coercion continued to be the policy of the Jeffersonians from 1809 to 1812, when the nation finally plunged into war. ‘is when a controller of a vital resource uses his advantage to compel a person to do something he would not do if this resource were not monopolized’. pg. 242

    Next Term: Fletcher v. Peck

    ReplyDelete
  65. Fletcher v. Peck
    Definition: A case in 1810, where a Georgia legislature fraudulently granted 35 million acres in the Yazoo River country (Mississippi) to privateers, the legislature repealed it after public outcry, but Marshall ruled that it was a contract, and that states couldn’t impair a contract.
    Historical Significance: The decision on the case was most noteworthy as further protecting property rights against popular pressures. It also showed clear assertions of the right of the Supreme Court to invalidate state laws conflicting with the federal Constitution.
    (Pg. 264)

    ReplyDelete
  66. Sylvester Graham: an American dietary reformer. He was an early advocate of dietary reform in the United States and was most notable for his emphasis on vegetarianism and the temperance movement. His popular dietary regime consisted of whole-wheat bread and crackers.
    Historical Significance: His self-prescribed patent medicines, or diets, were common. The use of medicine by the regular doctors was often harmful, and Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes declared in 1860 that if the medicines, as then employed, were thrown into the sea, humans would be better off and the fish worse off.

    Next Term: Headright System

    ReplyDelete
  67. Headright System- (Pg. 70) Whoever paid the passage of a laborer received the right to acquire 50 acres of land. (Part of the land was supposed to go to the laborer when their debt was worked off. Later, when freemen were denied the land they were promised, they began to revolt, and Bacon’s Rebellion followed shortly thereafter.)

    ReplyDelete
  68. Indian Removal Act:Passed by Congress in 1830. It provided for a transplantation of all Indian tribes then resident east of the Mississippi. Jackson’s policy led to the forced uprooting of more than 100.000 Indians. Ironically the heaviest blows fell on the Five Civilized Tribes .

    Next Term: Judiciary Act of 1789

    ReplyDelete
  69. Judiciary Act of 1789
    Definition: the Judiciary Act of 1789 organized the Supreme Court, with a chief justice and five associates, as well as federal district and circuit courts. It also established the office of attorney general. New Yorker John Jay, Madison’s collaborator on The Federalist papers, became the first chief justice of the United States.
    Historical Significance: This act was one of many new improvements made by the first Congress in an effort to preserve a strong central government while protecting individual liberties.
    (Pg. 202)

    ReplyDelete
  70. Horace Kallen: A philosopher who championed alternative conceptions of the immigrant role in American Society.He defended the newcomer’s right to practice their ancestral customs. In his view the U.S should provide a protective canopy for ethnic and racial groups to preserve their cultural uniqueness. Stressed the preservation of identity.
    Next Term: Lyon, Matthew

    ReplyDelete
  71. Matthew LYon: was the first person to be put to trial for violating the acts on charges of criticizing Federalist president John Adams and disagreeing with Adams' decision to go to war against France. Lyon was sentenced to four months in jail and ordered to pay a $1,000 fine and court costs. While in jail, Lyon won election to the Sixth Congress. In the election of 1800 Matthew Lyon cast the deciding vote for Jefferson after the election went to the House of Representatives because of an electoral tie.

    ReplyDelete
  72. What's the next word?? Don't leave us hanging!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  73. John Marshall
    Definition: Marshall was the fourth Chief Justice of the United States
    Historical Significance: John Marshall's court opinions helped lay the basis for American constitutional law and made the Supreme Court of the United States a coequal branch of government along with the legislative and executive branches. He strengthened federal authority, and gave the doctrine of loose construction, which stated that the federal government can use powers not stated in the constitution.
    (Pg. 263)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's what I'm thinking too!!! She's trying to build up suspense!

      Delete
    2. Or I'm trying to put it off for a little while so I can study for tomorrow :P

      Delete
    3. ughhh lol, but thats fine too becuz i wana take a break and study for a while:)

      Delete
    4. Ok, but you still have to post the next word... post it and then let someone define it and let them post the next word..... you can't purposely freeze the game..... that's just playing dirty!

      Delete
    5. You should post it as a new post - not here... someone may not see it. .... Never mind - I'll do it for ya!!! Go study!!!!

      Delete
  74. Wow... is it only the three of you going at it??? Where's the rest of your class? Quick note - not that you've done so - but you can't repeat terms. That'll be challenge for the rest of the class if they jump in now - they have to review all the terms you 3 have posted.

    BTW - GREAT JOB!!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So in order to get ready for this game, I spent a few hours compiling all the terms on my computer into one document, and in alphabetical order. Guess how many pages it took up on Microsoft Word? 182 pages. 182 PAGES. And that was with the font at times new roman size 7!!!

      Delete
  75. Come on - why don't you post the next word right after your definition? Just hit enter a couple of times and then write the next word - this delay is building up to much suspense!!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  76. National Banking Act: The banking system was used to create the sale of government bonds and to establish a uniform bank note currency. The system could purchase government savings bonds and money to back the bonds. The National Banking Act was made during the Civil War, and was the first real step taken toward a singular, unified banking system since jackson killed the bus.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. hold on give me a sec or two trying to find a term with o,
      I HATE the letter OOOOO

      Delete
    2. Oregon Treaty ( nort sure if it is a term we did but i have in my notebook)

      Delete
    3. I don't believe we had that one...

      Delete
  77. Ms. Rogers posted the NEXT TERM: National Banking Act

    ReplyDelete
  78. “Ohio Idea” – the plank in the 1868 Democratic platform pg. 539
    Historical Significance: a group of Midwestern delegates called for federal bonds to be redeemed in greenbacks

    ReplyDelete
  79. Pickett: u.s. army officer who became a general in the confederate states army during the american civil war. he is best remembered for his participation in the futile and bloody assault at the battle of gettysburg that bears his name, pickett's charge.

    Next Term: rule of reason

    ReplyDelete
  80. Rule of Reason: Under the Sherman Act, contracts or conspiracies are illegal only if they constitute an unreasonable restraint of trade or attempt to monopolize. If an agreement promotes competition, it may be legal. If it suppresses or destroys competition, it is unreasonable and illegal.

    ReplyDelete
  81. The Sun Also Rises:written and published in 1926 by Ernest Hemingway,he wrote about disillusioned, spiritually numb American expatriates in Europe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Next Term: The Theory of the Leisure Class

      Delete
  82. The Theory of the Leisure Class- Thorstein Veblen criticized the new rich (those who
    made money from the trusts) in this book

    ReplyDelete
  83. Union Party:The Union party included all of the Republicans and the war Democrats. It excluded the copperheads and peace Democrats. It was formed out of fear of the republican party losing control. It was responsible for nominating Lincoln.



    Next TERM: Virgina Plan

    ReplyDelete
  84. Virginia Plan- a plan by James Madison, for a new "national" government, its controversial ideas causing much debate at the convention. It called for a legislature of two houses; the lower house would be represented in proportion of population, and the upper house was elected by the lower. This idea favored larger states over smaller.

    ReplyDelete
  85. West: (October 10, 1738 - March 11, 1820) was an Anglo-American painter of historical scenes around and after the time of the American War of Independence. He was the second president of the Royal Academy in London, serving from 1792 to 1805 and 1806 to 1820.

    Next Term: Xenophobia (maybe a term we did)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. its hard to find terms with X and Z ugh

      Delete
    2. I'm pretty sure we didn't do that...

      Delete
    3. honestly i cant find any, is this one Malcolm X?

      Delete
    4. No, we haven't covered that in class yet...

      Delete
    5. ok, im going to keep looking til i find one

      Delete
    6. I don't think there are any more

      Delete
  86. ok then SKIP: X
    Next TERM: Yeoman farmers

    ReplyDelete
  87. Yeoman farmers- small landowners (the majority of white families in the south) who farmed their own land and usually did not own slaves

    ReplyDelete
  88. ZOra: Zan American folklorist, anthropologist, and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance. wrote four novels and more than 50 published short stories, plays, and essays, she is best known for her 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.

    Nect Term: chester A. Arthur

    ReplyDelete